YDNPA–December 2019

Reports from the YDNPA Full Authority meeting on December 17 and the Authority’s Planning Committee meeting on December 12: at the planning meeting there were applications concerning  Yore Mill at Aysgarth; Shoemakers Barn at Grinton, Red Lion Farm at Beamsley; Cracoe; Grassington; Long Preston ; and Ravenstonedale.  A decision concerning Ingleton Quarry was deferred.

Severe back muscle spasms not only forced me into hibernation for most of the month but also made it nearly impossible for me to do any typing. The (voluntary)  ARC News Service aims to provide as complete as possible archive of decisions made at the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority’s (YDNPA) planning committee meetings and as many of the Full Authority meetings as possible. Thankfully these days the Local Democracy Report, Stuart Minting, also attends those meetings.  Below are links to his reports posted on Richmondshire Today:

Full Authority meeting  December 17

http://www.richmondshiretoday.co.uk/yorkshire-dales-national-park-authority-members-raise-concerns-over-tree-planting-plans/

http://www.richmondshiretoday.co.uk/action-plan-unveiled-to-protect-outstanding-cultural-heritage-in-yorkshire-dales/

YDNPA Planning meeting December 10

Yore Mill at Aysgarth:

http://www.richmondshiretoday.co.uk/restoration-of-historic-dales-mill-approved-after-car-parking-issue-resolved/

Shoemakers Barn at Grinton and Red Lion Farm at Beamsley: 

http://www.richmondshiretoday.co.uk/farmers-speak-of-relief-after-backing-from-national-park-planning-committee/

(also see ARC News Service  reports in November)

ARC News Service reports, December planning meeting:

Cracoe

A request by Craven District councillors Robert Heseltine and Richard Foster for a site visit was turned down by the committee. Cllrs Heseltine and Foster argued members should see for themselves how  a proposed new agricultural building at Meadow Croft in Back Lane, Cracoe, would have a negative impact on the landscape and the amenity of neighbours.

But the majority of the committee agreed with  North Yorkshire County councillor Richard Welch and Lancashire County councillor Cosima Towneley that the planning officer had worked hard with the applicant to find a suitable site. The officer explained that the original application for a larger building submitted by James Bowdin was refused because it would have been on a much more prominent site and 20m from a neighbouring property. This application for a smaller building next to Mr Bowden’s house would be 24m from a neighbouring property.

A neighbour, Helen Pullin, however, told the committee that due to the building being on higher ground it would still be overbearing  even if dug in by 200mm to help reduce its height, and the trees to be planted to create screening would be only 15m from her property. Like Cllrs Heseltine and Foster she maintained that the building would still have a negative impact on the landscape.  They agreed with Cracoe Parish Meeting that there were better sites for the building and that it would still be too large.

They also asked how a smallholding of two acres and 30 sheep was sufficient to qualify for an agricultural building.  “Are we setting a precedent?” asked Cllr Foster.

The head of development management, Richard Graham, responded that the applicant was also a self-employed dry stone waller. He, therefore, needed the building not just for storing winter feed and lambing in spring, but also to store agricultural machinery.

Grassington

The committee unanimously approved an application for a single storey lean-to extension at the rear of a house in Main Street, Grassington, and for stone steps and a wrought iron handrail at the front.

The planning officer reported that the applicant had explained that the steps beside an existing wall were required to provide safe level access down a slope which was steep and slippery in bad weather.

Grassington Parish Council had objected to the steps because they would not be in keeping with the village and would create an obstruction and therefore a danger to road users. It added that the steepness could be mitigated by walking where the slop was less severe.

Ingleton Quarry

David Parrish explained that due to a recent appeal court decision the a decision concerning the application by Hanson Quarry Products Europe Ltd to extend its permission to continue working at Ingleton Quarry until until December 2025 instead of ending in May 2020 should be deferred and this was agreed.

The Friends of the Dales had objected to the proposal to extend the operational life of the quarry. It stated: “The 2015 application secured an extension until May 2015 to allow reserves remaining in the quarry to be extracted. We are now told a further five years are needed. The quarry should close to schedule and be restored.”

The chairman of the Authority’s planning committee, Julie Martin, is a trustee of the Friends of the Dales.

Long Preston

Permission was granted for the construction of 16 new affordable homes off Green Gate Lane in Long Preston even though the parish council had felt this would be over-intensive use of the site.

The planning officer explained that in 2014 and again June 2017 permission was given for 13 affordable homes to be built where there had been a large industrial building and a yard. The new application was for eight affordable homes for rent, and the others to be affordable through shared ownership with a Registered Provider retaining the freehold so that they can never be sold outright. She said that the total number of bedrooms had only increased by one.

Long Preston Parish Council stated it did not object to the affordable housing development but, besides what it viewed as over-intensive use of the site, was very concerned about the safety of children walking to and from school as the roads and lanes around the school were narrow with no paths or pavement.

Cllr Welch agreed with the parish council that the access into Green Gate Lane from Maypole Green was very narrow. Like other members he emphasised the need for affordable homes and said: “We have lost two schools [in this area] in the past few years. We would rather have extra houses than lose schools.”

The planning officer pointed out that there was a footpath from the development site to close to the school.

Jocelyn Manners-Armstrong pointed out that the plans included no bungalows for elderly people and asked if any lifts would be installed to help people access the second floor flats. “We are supposed to think about housing for life. And sometimes even young people need lifts,” she commented.

Mr Graham said that suggestion would be considered. And the planning officer added that the application included a mix of housing to allow for various needs. The housing varies from three-bedroom houses to  one-bedroom flats.

Ravenstonedale

Mr Graham assured members that the Flooding Authority would be asked again if sufficient measures would be undertaken to ensure that the construction of a local needs house in the garden of Coldbeck House in Ravenstonedale would not increase the possibility of flooding in that area of the village.

The majority voted in favour of permission being granted once that assurance was given. Both Ian McPherson and Cllr Welch emphasised that the main problem was the possibility of flooding and a resident, Diane Palmer, told the committee that on that issue the Authority had a duty of care.

This had formed part of the objection made by Ravenstonedale Parish Council which was presented by Scott Thornley. It had argued that the construction of the house would have a negative impact upon spacious layout of what was possibly the oldest part of the village and is a Conservation Area. It disagreed that this was an “infill site” and was concerned about the impact not only on neighbours but also the remaining section of the historic mill leat as well as how  removing several  trees would affect the red squirrels.

The planning officer maintained that this would be an infill site in accordance with Eden District Council’s planning policy. He said the applicant had modified an earlier application due to the issues raised by the parish council and residents. The proposed house was now smaller and there would be a flood attenuation tank below ground on the southern side of the site plus a permeable surface for the car parking area.

He said that the high retaining wall around the existing garden would severely limit views into the site and restrict any impact upon neighouring properties.  He added that the mill leat would be retained.

The applicant, Christopher Kelly, told the committee: “We have worked hard with the National Park officers and we believe that this new house in this location would have minimal impact.”

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